The 10 most photogenic spots in Athens – Athens, Greece

Are you going to visit Athens and hoping to take some beautiful pictures to show your family and friends when you return? After the post about the most photogenic spots in Paris, I put together a similar list about the best places to take beautiful pictures in Athens.

12

The Parthenon
Just like you can’t skip taking a picture with the Eiffeltower in Paris, you can’t miss a picture of the most famous ancient Greek temple in your holiday photobook. Taking a picture with the Parthenon can prove to be quite difficult, since it’s really large, so it’s an advantage if you have a camera with a wide angle lens. Another difficult part of taking pictures with the Parthenon is the wind, which is often strong on top of the Acropolis. My solution was to take a picture with a GoPro, but my hair still didn’t survive the wind.

The Propylaea and temple of Athena Nike
This is the place where you can get the closest to the ancient columns and from where you also have a nice view over Athens. There also isn’t as much wind as at the Parthenon, but there are lots of people, so it can be difficult to not get any other people in the picture.

14

The Erechtheion
I was really excited to see this temple, because I wanted to see the caryatids, the statues of women that function as columns. Unfortunately, you can’t get very close to this side of the temple, so you need a zoom function on your camera for a shot of the caryatids with a view over Athens on the background. To see the real caryatids, you can go to the Acropolis Museum, where you can see them up close.

8

The Anafiotika neighbourhood
Do you want to feel like you’re walking around on a Greek island, but you don’t have the time or money to go there? Walk around in the Anafiotika neighbourhood, with its white small streets and its many stairs and cats. It lies right next to the Acropolis, but on the other side than where the entrance is.

1

Changing of the guards
In front of the tomb of the unknown soldier on the Syntagma square, there are always at least two guards. The changing of the guards happens every hour, but the guards sometimes march up and down as well. The guards in traditional uniforms make for great photographs, especially when they are marching up and down during the changing of the guards.

9

Street art
There’s a lot of graffiti in Athens, which also means that there’s a lot of street art. The picture above was made in the Anafiotika neighbourhood, just east of the Acropolis, but you can also find many street art pieces in the small streets north of the Acropolis and in the small alleys around Monastiraki Square.

Mount Lycabettus
This 300 metres high hill lies whitin walking distance of the centre of Athens and from the top, you have an amazing view over the city and the sea. You can choose to climb the hill or to take the furnicular, which departs every half hour.

10

The cathedral of Athens
I love beautiful church interiors, so I was amazed when I entered the cathedral of Athens. It was so beautifully decorated, with lots of gold. It was pretty dark inside the church, which made photography a little difficult, so you have to keep your camera still.

4

Sunset over Athens
Athens has many roof terraces from where you can view the sunset. Our hotel even had its own roof terrace. Unfortunately, there was a lot of wind, which made it a little too cold to sit down and have a drink, but the sunset was beautiful from there. You could of course also view the sunset from the Lycabettus hill of from the Acropolis.

Explore Athens’ museums
Walk around in some of Athens’ museums and photograph beautiful ancient sculptures, vases and jewelry. These pictures were taken in the National Archeological museum, but the Acropolis Museum is also a must-see!

Read More:

The 15 most photogenic spots in Paris ā€“ Paris, France

The best preserved ancient theatre in the world ā€“ Epidaurus, Greece

A beautifully built city, rich in gold ā€“ Mycenae, Greece

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